News from the world of biofuels

bioenergyConsultFeb2016
2017 most likely will be a turning point in the implementation of the Energy Union objectives and the 2030 climate and Energy package. Several initiatives are in place as the new Renewable Energy Directive for the period after 2020-2030, an updated EU Bioenergy Sustainability Policy. But do not forget commitments made in the 2015 Paris Agreement.
The Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC, together with the Biofuels Directive 2003 and the Fuel Quality Directive , is one of the main pillars of biofuels policy. The Directive set legally binding targets for Member States to fulfil at least 20% of its total energy needs with renewables by 2020.
On November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Renewable Energy Directive within a broader Clean Energy package of proposals. The ultimate goal of the proposal is to increase the share of renewable energy sources in the overall energy mix to at least 27 % by 2030, whilst ensuring that the EU becomes the world leader in renewable energy. This binding target will be fulfilled through individual Member States’ contributions guided by the need to deliver collectively for the EU.
Decarbonisation of transport through development of advanced biofuels and definition of the role of food-based biofuels after 2020 are among the main challenges identified by the Commission.The revised Renewable Energy Directive introduces an obligation on European transport fuel suppliers to provide an increasing share of renewable and low-carbon fuels, including advanced biofuels, renewable transport fuels of non-biological origin (e.g. hydrogen), waste-based fuels and renewable electricity. At the same time, to minimize the Indirect Land-Use Change (ILUC) impacts, introduces a cap on the contribution of food-based biofuels towards the EU renewable energy target, starting at 7% in 2021 and going down progressively to 3.8% in 2030.The revised Renewable Energy Directive also strengthens the existing EU criteria for bioenergy sustainability. The Commission is committed to make the biomass for energy sustainable, improving sustainability criteria for biofuels, requiring that (new) advanced biofuels emit at least 70% fewer GHG emissions than fossil fuels.
The proposal has been referred to the Parliament’s Industry, Research and Energy Committee, where the work is still at preparatory phase.